10.03.2014

Contacts Are Better Than Permanent Lenses For Babies After Cataract Surgery

Contacts Are Better Than Permanent Lenses For Babies After Cataract Surgery

A recent study by NIH for the National Eye Institute reports that study finds that Permanent lenses lead to more repeat eye surgeries following cataract surgery, as reported by redorbit.com

For adults and children who undergo cataract surgery, implantation of an artificial lens is the standard of care. But a clinical trial suggests that for most infants, surgery, followed by the use of contact lenses for several years—and an eventual lens implant—may be the better solution. The trial was funded in part by the National Eye Institute (NEI), a component of the National Institutes of Health

Although cataracts are often tied to aging, it’s estimated that 1,200-1,600 infants are diagnosed with congenital cataracts (present from birth) each year in the United States. The condition can affect both eyes, but it often affects just one, which is called unilateral cataract. The new study compared the use of IOLs versus the use of contact lenses during infancy for treating congenital unilateral cataract.

A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens, and can be removed through a safe, quick surgical procedure. After cataract removal, most adults and children receive a permanent artificial lens, called an intraocular lens (IOL). This is an option for infants, too, but the trial found that the use of contact lenses is safer than, and just as effective as, an IOL for infants under seven months old. The most recent data from the trial were published today in JAMA Ophthalmology.

by Emily Tait


« Back to list