Eye Health Central

Removing Soft Lenses

Removing soft lenses

So, you’ve finally mastered the art of placing contacts in your eyes. Congrats! Now, um, how do you get them out? 

Don’t worry; we’ve got all the tips and tricks you need to know about removing contacts in this handy guide. As long as you learn the proper technique from the get-go, you shouldn’t have too many issues removing your contacts every night. In fact, many contacts-wearers say removing lenses comes more naturally than placing lenses in their eyes. 

How To Remove Contact Lenses: A Basic Technique  

Let’s begin this post by sharing a basic technique for pulling contact lenses out of your eyes. After thoroughly washing and drying your hands with a clean towel, follow these simple steps: 

  •  Using your non-dominant hand, pull up on your upper eyelid with your forefinger and middle finger.
    Removing Soft lenses step 1
  •  Simultaneously pull down on your lower eyelid with the middle finger of your dominant hand.
  •  Using your dominant hand’s index finger, pull the contact lens slightly down towards the right. Some contact lens wearers find it’s easier to stare upwards and pull their contact straight down. Of course, as you get more comfortable pulling out your contacts, feel free to modify these general rules to suit your preferences.
    Remove soft lenses step 2 slide lens
  •  Grab the lens by pinching it with your thumb and index fingers.
    Remove soft lenses pinch stage 3
  •  If you’re using a long-term lens, wash it with disinfectant solution and place inside your solution-filled lens case.  
    Remove soft lenses stage 4 cleaning


Just be sure never to rinse your eyes or contacts with tap water. It’s extremely easy for harmful waterborne microorganisms to attach themselves to contact lenses. 

Do You Need Short Nails To Remove Contacts? 

Generally speaking, optometrists recommend contact lens wearers cut their nails about once per week. While it’s possible to insert and remove contacts with long nails, it’s far more difficult and not super hygienic.  

Obviously, your nails are sharper than your fingers, making it far more likely you will scratch your lenses or your eyes. Plus, we often trap a great deal of dirt, grime, and bacteria in our nails, all of which could easily end up on your lenses. 

Even with normal-sized nails, you need to be careful to handle your contacts with your fingertips. If you get in the habit of holding your contacts with your nails, you could easily scratch or tear your lenses or expose them to debris.   

If you love your long nails and still want to wear contacts, we recommend trimming the nails on those fingers that you use to remove your contact lenses.

An understandable question many contact lens wearers have that’s somewhat related to removing lenses is how often to change their lens case. While there’s no hard-and-set rule here, most optometrists agree it’s best to get rid of your contact lens case at least once every three months. Using a case for longer than three months will put you at greater risk for infectious diseases. 

Can I remove soft contact lenses with a Sucker?

Removing soft lensesThere are a variety of suckers on the market, like Optiwand that are used to hold your contact lenses for insertion, BUT they cannot be used for removal. 

Soft contact lenses are porous, so it is impossible for the sucker to get a seal on the contact lens. 

Optiwand clearly state on their sales material that ' IT IS NOT A SUCTION CUP FOR SOFT CONTACT REMOVAL. SOFT LENSES ARE NOT A SOLID MATERIAL AND MUST BE PINCHED OUT.'

However, customers have found it useful by placing the device over the contact lens and pinching the end of it - especially if they have large fingers. Customers on Amazon are divided in their reviews - a lot find it indispensable for insertion, while others find it useless. Remember if you use this device to clean it regularly. 

How Often should I change my Contact Lens Case?

While on the subject of contact lens cases, remember to only wash these cases with a doctor-approved solution. It’s also important to dry out your lens cases when they aren’t in use and place them upside-down without the caps on. If you notice any mold or accidentally expose your lens case to tap water, then you should throw it away immediately.  

By the way, we have a wide assortment of contacts case designs to choose from. Whether you’re into animals, racing cars, or even macaroons, there’s a good chance we have just the case for you. Definitely check out our contact lens case line by clicking on this link

Prepping For Perfection: How To Desensitise Your Eyes

For some people, touching their eyes is no big deal; for others, it’s a Herculean task. If you’re someone who struggles to touch your eyes, there are a few simple ways to prep yourself for contact lenses before you even ask your optometrist about them.

First off, buy some artificial tears and practice putting a few drops in each eye every day. Once you can put in these drops without flinching, wash and dry your hands and hold your eye open as if you were about to put in a contact lens. Now, slowly bring your dominant hand’s index finger forward until you can touch the eye. If it helps, look upward and only touch the whites of your eyes. 

Need More Help With Contacts? Check Out Our Education Portal 

We love helping our customers better understand how to properly care for their contact lenses. That’s why we’ve created this comprehensive Education Portal chockfull of useful info on all things related to healthy eye care. To find more interesting posts just like this one, be sure to click on this link to our Education Portal’s homepage.

Video

How to remove your soft contact lenses


Author: John Dreyer Optometrist Bsc(Hons), MCOPTOM, DipCLP
Created: 24 Apr 2015, Last modified: 4 Mar 2020