Eye Health Central

Q & A

What is a Stye?

What is a Stye?

14 Jan 2020

A stye is a swollen and infected meibomian gland within either the upper or lower eyelid. These glands normally secrete small amounts of an oily liquid that helps lubricate the surface of the eye, and prevent tears from evaporating too quickly. When these glands become clogged, they can fill with this fluid and become infected. A stye is not very dissimilar to a common pimple. Find out how to treat them.

What is a Chalazion?

What is a Chalazion?

14 Jan 2020

More people are likely to have a chalazion than know what they are called. Simply put, a chalazion is a harmless, painless bump just inside the edge of either the upper or lower eyelid. They are the end result of styes that have mostly healed, and are no longer infected. A chalazion is nothing more than a benign cysts growing out of one of the meibomian glands in the eye lid, which are responsible for producing the oily substance that lubricates the eyes.

What is a Black Eye?

What is a Black Eye?

14 Jan 2020

Nearly every black eye comes with a story, and usually not a very fun one, since they're caused by a blunt force trauma to the eye. Their medically referred to as periorbital hematoma, but your grand dad would probably call it a shiner. A black eye's dark appearance comes from the fluid build-up, usually blood, in the tissue surrounding the eye. The skin in that area of the face is very thin, and virtually transparent when stretched thin. As fluids build up, and cause the area to swell, they can be seen easily, giving a black eye its distinct appearance.